Kids Printable Activities

Reading Worksheets for A-Z


Kids printable activities help reinforce what has already been learned. These reading worksheets (one for every letter of the alphabet) help children to recognize the words along with the pictures.

Worksheets come in handy when teaching the alphabet and learning to read. With several pictures starting with a specific letter are shown, it reinforces the sounds that each letter makes. The more repetition children have, the more likely they are to retain what is being taught.

Use the free printables as a quick reading activity to review what has already been learned.

To print, simply click on the printable of your choice. This will open the file in PDF format. Please keep all copyright information intact.

Kids Printable Activities - Letter Worksheets

There is a separate worksheet for each letter of the alphabet. Have your child read the words and draw a line from the word to the correct picture.

If you child is just learning to read, the picture cues will give them hints. For example, my grandson could not read all the letter A words. He could however, use the beginning sounds of the words to figure out that a-m meant ambulance once he looked at all the pictures.

Letter A Reading Worksheet
Letter B Reading Worksheet
Letter C Reading Worksheet
Letter D Reading Worksheet
Letter E Reading Worksheet
Letter F Reading Worksheet
Letter G Reading Worksheet
Letter H Reading Worksheet
Letter I Reading Worksheet
Letter J Reading Worksheet
Letter K Reading Worksheet
Letter L Reading Worksheet
Letter M Reading Worksheet
Letter N Reading Worksheet
Letter O Reading Worksheet
Letter P Reading Worksheet
Letter Q Reading Worksheet
Letter R Reading Worksheet
Letter S Reading Worksheet
Letter T Reading Worksheet
Letter U Reading Worksheet
Letter V Reading Worksheet
Letter W Reading Worksheet
Letter X Reading Worksheet
Letter Y Reading Worksheet
Letter Z Reading Worksheet

Base Lessons on Your Child's Readiness

Always keep your child's attention span in mind. Children seem born ready to wiggle and move because that's what they are supposed to be doing. Sitting at a table for lessons at a young age will make many children tune out. Make the lessons very short. Make sure they are age appropriate for your child.

Some children truly want to learn at an early age. I have a son who entered kindergarten reading at a third grade reading level. He loved learning at an early age and did quite well. He had a blast with flashcards and worksheets. He loved reading with me and on his own.

Another son had no real interest. He knew his alphabet letters before kindergarten but had no idea of the sounds the letters made. He was really not ready to learn to read until the age of six. But once he became interested he learned to read quite easily.

Always take your child's interest into consideration. Keep lessons very short and never push a child who is not interested. Pushing leads to probable failure because the child is not ready and will not naturally develop self confidence in what they are learning.

Both of the above boys are now grown adults and doing very well in their chosen professions. One was reading well at the age of four, the other at the age of seven. What matters is not the age at which they learned, but that they learned to read well when they were ready. Let your child lead and use the reading printables when they are ready.



from kids printable activities to reading worksheets main page

back to home page